Anti-Creator Hysteria Restricted Blogger

An editor from Scientific American wouldn’t allow John Horgan to use this headline, “Pssst! Don’t tell the creationists, but scientists don’t have a clue how life began.”

“Exactly 20 years ago, I wrote an article for Scientific American that, in draft form, had the headline above. My editor nixed it, so we went with something less dramatic: “In the Beginning…: Scientists are having a hard time agreeing on when, where and—most important—how life first emerged on the earth.” That editor is gone now, so I get to use my old headline, which is even more apt today.”

You name it, DNA first, RNA, and metabolism-first are more frustrating and puzzling with insurmountable obstacles for various evolutionists. Crick’s rescue solution for the problem on how life supposedly arose is not valid either, “Crick’s old escape route doesn’t solve anything: “Of course, panspermia theories merely push the problem of life’s origin into outer space.”

In the New York Times“Two dozen chemists, geologists, biologists, planetary scientists and physicists gathered here recently to ponder where and what Eden might have been. Over a long weekend they plastered the screen in their conference room with intricate chemical diagrams through which electrons bounced in a series of interactions like marbles rattling up and down and over bridges through one of those child’s toys, transferring energy, taking care of the business of nascent life. The names of elements and molecules tripped off chemists’ tongues as if they were the eccentric relatives who show up at Thanksgiving every year.”

“The rapid appearance of complex life in some accounts — “like Athena springing from the head of Zeus,” in the words of Dr. McKay”

Interesting how baal worship is used in a positive light during a science discussion. Back to blogger, John Horgan. He eventually finds his comfort zone by ranting on creationists, claiming that we “blame” God for the creation.  Listen John, your rant was uncalled for, we do not “blame” God for creating the heavens and earth! It’s not a curse but rather a glorious blessing! We are amazed and excited about  by such an advanced design from the simple things to the more complex with its incredible beauty!   We look forward to learning more on how it works. We thank Him for what He has given us, so John, we don’t blame him for these things which were created by Him!  

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8 thoughts on “Anti-Creator Hysteria Restricted Blogger

  1. [W]e do not “blame” God for creating the heavens and earth! …. We thank Him for what He has given us,”

    I’ll believe that when fundamentalists stop treating the Earth as their personal toilet. Spewing billions of tons of greenhouse gases and noxious waste into the ecosphere; slavering through irreplaceable resources; callously disregarding the plants and animals that they believe display the glory of God.

    They not only destroy creation, they deny that it is happening.

    I’d say John Horgan got it exactly right. It sounds as though you do “‘blame’ God for the creation.”

  2. Olorin,

    Lets not forget when we stop pouring toxic waist on Native American Reservations and dig up coal on their territories which has had negative consequences on their lives….all in the name of progress. [1]

    God, in the Bible, has intended us to be the care-takers of the earth… It is so ironic that it is mostly Non-Christians (many of whom are Native Americans) lived more of a Christian life than many fundamentalist Christians, even long before 1492. [2]

    ———–
    [1] For more details, see the Book “Ecocide of Native America: Environmental Destruction of Indian Lands and Peoples”, written by Grinde and Johansen.

    [2] I’ve recently taken a class on Native American history, and it has really done something to me.

  3. “The rapid appearance of complex life in some accounts — “like Athena springing from the head of Zeus,” in the words of Dr. McKay”

    Interesting how baal [sic] worship is used in a positive light during a science discussion.

    Michael may not have much in the realm of facts, but he certainly has a vivid imagination.

    A scientist invoking a reference to a widely-understood myth implies that the scientist worships a Greek god. We thought you believed that scientists were all atheists.

    Any other puerile charges you’d care to level against science while you’re at it, Michael?

  4. Scientists don’t know how life began. That is correct, but if it makes you feel better, we’ll just start saying it was magic…that way our arguments will have equal validity

  5. Olorin,

    Speaking of a “Greek god” creating, this makes me wonder: Would Michael take evidence of Zeus or Hermes as evidence of Jehovah (or Yahweh, or however one prefers to call God)? — I suspect so.

  6. “The rapid appearance of complex life in some accounts — “like Athena springing from the head of Zeus,” in the words of Dr. McKay”

    Interesting how baal [sic] worship is used in a positive light during a science discussion.

    As if that were not enough, now we have the Bible being portrayed in a positive light in a science discussion[1]—

    Different populations in ancient Africa probably contributed various genes and behaviours to modern humans, says Stringer. “I don’t think there was a single Garden of Eden where it all happened.”

    .

    Oops. Maybe I just gave Michael another opportunity to debunk evolution. If, as this paper claims, the hominin lineage began in southern Africa, rather than in east Africa, then obviously the entire theory of evolution must fall like an overripe papaya,[2] and special creation must stand proven beyond an umbra of doubt.

    ===========

    [1] Kaplan, “Gene Study Challenges Human Origins in Eastern Africa,” Scientific American, describing a PNAS paper published online on March 7: Henn, et al, “Hunter-gatherer genomic diversity suggests a southern African origin for modern humans”.

    [2] The papaya seem especially tender and delicious here in Maui this year. Unfortunately, the mangoes are not yet quite ready.

  7. Hey As4090l…

    It is interesting to note, There is always faith that someday a new revelation might happen. This is the strength of Darwinism when the data doesn’t match up with its theory. Evolutionary scientists are more puzzled about how life began than ever before which makes its position weaker. I believe it takes more faith to believe in evolution than God.

  8. I believe it takes more faith to believe in evolution than [sic] God..

    Strangely enough, I think Michael is perfectly justified in his belief.

    Michael’s post clearly show that he knows very little about evolution, and “what he does know ain’t so.”[1] He cannot rid himself of the teleological assumption, of the imputation of external agency, of his confusion between “information” and “meaning.” These are not small matters of incorrect facts, but rather an inability to understand entire scientific principles.

    Arthur C. Clarke once said that any sufficiently advanced technology appears to be magic. Since Michael understands nothing about evolution, it is not surprising that he views this theory as a form of magic. Magic that must be taken on faith.

    For the rest of us, however, the more one knows about evolution, the less faith is required to accept it.

    ============

    [1] Apologies, Mark Twain.

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