Field Trips To A Creationist Zoo Upsets Secularists

The government in the UK approved public school kids of visiting the Noah Ark Zoo farm. Michael Marshall at New Scientist says the educational resources appear “absolutely fine”  with all it’s animals (including big ones like rhinos and giraffes), and it accepts school parties with kids of all ages. But the world starts coming to an end for Marshall is when the zoo advocates a creationist position.

He writes from the zoo’s website…

“Darwinism has no explanation of how the atoms and all the laws of nature should just come to “be there”, no adequate theory of how life with its highly complex DNA suddenly appeared, and no evidence to show that single-celled life forms evolved into the much more complex forms of the later fossil record.  It also cannot explain how consciousness, instinct, free will, and sexual reproduction came into being.”

In other words, it has no “viable” explanation, many assumptions and predictions have been falsified with new discoveries. Any theorist can make a guess on what happened in the unobservable past but that doesn’t necessarily make it factual. When any other theory becomes so-complex as evolution, red flags go up!

Marshall gets mean like a bully, full of arrogance when he writes…

“Criticising a family-run zoo that introduces small children to the wonder of animals feels a bit like kicking a puppy – but in this case we might have to.”

This wasn’t the end of a secularist anger and fear as another piece in LiveScience appeared in print just recently…

“The Noah’s Ark Zoo Farm in the UK has a presentation about 30 reasons why man is not descended from apes. Given the establishment believes in creationism, that presentation is no surprise. But that school children would attend the place has some educators alarmed. Noah’s Ark Zoo Farm, near Bristol, was recently awarded a “quality badge” by the Council for Learning Outside the Classroom.”

In the United States the government has funded an imam behind a plan to build a mosque near Ground Zero which is something that doesn’t happen with every other religion who wants to build one of their ‘holy’ places and certainly we haven’t seen secularists upset over that.  But like Marshall’s argument against the zoo Robert Roy Britt is full of bluff and fluff and he wants to undo what many parents teach their kids. Not surprising he uses the excuse he doesn’t have the time so he doesn’t really explain his position using science. But here is some of what the zoo states that has angered secularists…

“In the animal kingdom the animals closest to human beings in bodily appearance are the great apes. Perhaps, then, we should not expect apes to differ much in their genetic make-up…”

“The connections between genes, their position in the chromosome, and the machinery for regulating them can be as significant as the code itself. Consequently it is meaningless to quantify the differences in terms of a precise percentage…

This has also been apparent from attempts to count the number of genes. The human genome consists of approximately 21,000.  But bread mould has half as many, the sea anemone Nematostella has only 3,000 less and the tiny crustacean Daphnia pulex has 39,000 – almost twice as many as human beings. Or one could simply count the number of nucleotides (information bits, like letters of the alphabet) that go into the code. Human beings have about 3.42 billion nucleotides, the green puffer fish 0.34 billion and the marbled lungfish a record-breaking 130 billion.

That does not mean that the biology of the lungfish is 40 times more complex than ours, or that it is evolutionarily 40 times more advanced. It does mean that we have a lot more to find out about the mind-boggling complexity of the genome – even of ‘simple’ genomes – and that the insistence that it all came about by chance is about as unscientific a conclusion as one could imagine.

“To rub further salt into such absurdities, even just a 1% difference between man and chimp would mean 34 million points of difference. Over the 6 million years that their genomes supposedly diverged, each would have undergone 34 million mutations, equivalent to almost 6 a year.”

“While some were inconsequential, most, it is thought, were selected and incorporated into the genome because they conferred an advantage as men and chimps struggled for survival. But that this is how the differences arose is dogma, not science.  And implausible dogma: there is no obligation to believe it just because others do.”


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3 thoughts on “Field Trips To A Creationist Zoo Upsets Secularists

  1. I suppose a privately owned zoo has the right to promote and discuss whichever ideas it likes, but if the ideas – as would seem to be the case in this case – are nonsensical notions and statements which flatly deny the obvious then it probably shouldn’t be a place for educational school trips.

    Thanks for the read :)

  2. The government in the UK approved public school kids of visiting the Noah Ark Zoo farm. Michael Marshall at New Scientist says the educational resources appear “absolutely fine” with all it’s animals (including big ones like rhinos and giraffes), and it accepts school parties with kids of all ages. But the world starts coming to an end for Marshall is when the zoo advocates a creationist position.

    Wow. Next thing you know, creationist home-schoolers will let their children go to the British Museum. Nah. Never happen.Their governing organizations would never permit it.

    Well, someday it might happen. About the same time that Michael releases his readership numbers, sets out his qualifications in science—or maybe even reviews Signature in the Cell.

    But, so far…….

  3. In the United States the government has funded an imam behind a plan to build a mosque near Ground Zero which is something that doesn’t happen with every other religion who wants to build one of their ‘holy’ places and certainly we haven’t seen secularists upset over that.

    You shouldn’t complain, Michael. The government helps fund your creationist bvlog. They help out with your kids’ school lunches so you have more money to pursue your nefarious goals.

    If you read the New York Post article just a liiiitle bit more closely, you may see that Foggy Bottom hopes to reap some benefit front the trip that they partially funded for this imam (peace be unto him). Did you spot it? About the contacts with Muslim organizations? No? I thought not.

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