Dragons Legends and Myths: Are They For Real?

Dragon history is interesting because it’s nearly universal throughout the world’s ancient cultures. Some say the fossil “Dracorex hogwartsia” was discovered by ancient people, thus man’s imagine of dragons was born, so they say.

But “Dracorex hogwartsia” has been found only in North America, not anywhere else.  So a question remains, how did the ancient Chinese, Australian aboriginal, Egyptian, Babylonian, Welsh, and other cultures come up with such a similar dragon legend if the fossils that fueled their imagination were so rare and were discovered on the other side of the world?

And another questions comes to mind, how do so many different cultures were able to invent such similar details about their dragon, unless their ancestors actually encountered them?

Records of the Greek historian Herodotus and the Jewish historian Josephus describe flying reptiles in ancient Egypt and Arabia. In other cultures, it was a great honor to kill these creatures. There are numerous records of warriors killing great beasts in order to establish credibility in a village. Gilgamesh, Fafnir, Beowulf and other famous legends, including the mythology of Egypt, Greece and Rome, include specific descriptions of dragons and other dinosaur-like creatures.

Discoveries of asian pottery and royal robes with these dragon like dinosaurs, also on Egyptian burial shrouds and government seals, Peruvian burial stones and tapestries, Mayan sculptures, Aboriginal and Native American petroglyphs (carved rock drawings), and many other pieces of ceremonial art throughout ancient cultures.

So why are evolutionists suggesting a rare fossil to explain all those similar details in different cultures? Because within the Darwinian framework, the majority decided that dinosaurs did not live with man.

However, in the Bible…The word “dragon” (Hebrew: tannin) is used throughout the Old Testament, and most directly translates as “sea or land monsters.” In the Book of Job, the author describes the great creatures, Behemoth (Job 40) and Leviathan (Job 41).  So dragon-looking dinosaurs did in fact existed with humans as it’s broad foundation in history bares out.

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7 thoughts on “Dragons Legends and Myths: Are They For Real?

  1. Dragons do not have to be based on actuall living pre-historic animals in order for folklore to be developed. The geologic time shows they went extinct at about v65 million years ago.

    As for the word “tannin,” — a more accurate translation is serpent, and it doesn’t match Ken Ham’s claims. So, there is no case here.

    Links:

    http://www.answersincreation.org/argument/D1321_creation_science.htm

    http://www.talkorigins.org/indexcc/CH/CH712.html

  2. Michael: “Dragon history is interesting because it’s nearly universal throughout the world’s ancient cultures. ”

    Really? What did the dragons of the American Indians look like? Please cite some stories of dragons in ancient African cultures? Australian aborigines? Polyneisans? Let’s see. That leaves Eurasia. Dragon myths were already extantl at the time of Agamemnon, and strictly European dragons were unknown until Greco-Roman influence had carried them there.

    The Persian culture spread with conquests to India and Palestine, and is early enough to account for the Vedic and biblical dragons. Are Persian and Greek dragons from the same source? The likelihood is such that you’d have to have positive evidence that they were not. The recently discovered Indus culture was early enough, and had trade ranging throughout that entire area for a couple of centuries.

    The Chine dragon is obviously the source of all the far-east legends. It seems independent of the Geek/Persian variety. However, the classic Chinese dragon is quite a different beast—so to speak—from its western counterpart. It is physically small, smaller than a human. It can assume different forms, including human. In contrast with the malevolent western species, the Chines dragon was a friendly beast.

    So we have perhaps two independent sources of dragon legends. Hardly the stuff of numerous independent world-wide sightings..

    Michael: “And another questions comes to mind, how do so many different cultures were able to invent such similar details about their dragon, unless their ancestors actually encountered them?”

    Two ios not very many. And, as noted, the far-eastern dragons are portrayed quite differently from the western ones.

    Could people just make up tall stories about imaginary animals? You cite many storiesd of people fighting them and killing them (always in parivate, of course). How many of those stories do you credit? How many were brought back to be mounted on the killer’s ego wall?

    Michael: “So why are evolutionists suggesting a rare fossil to explain all those similar details in different cultures?”

    They’re not. Every research biologist in the world is suggesting that one fossil was the inspiration for hundreds of independent myths? Go read your source again. Or at least cite it.

    Michael: “Because within the Darwinian framework, the majority decided that dinosaurs did not live with man.”

    The majority does not rule in science. Evidence. Remember? We have evidence that the dinosaurs breathed their last a gazillion years before homo sapiens started making up tales of mythical beasts.. If you want to see a dinosaur with a saddle on it, you’ll hgave to visit Ken Ham’s Creation Museum. I’ve heard they’re animated, too. You would be impressed.

  3. “Dragons do not have to be based on actuall living pre-historic animals in order for folklore to be developed. ”

    krissmith is right, Michael. For example, I can make up a tale about giant saucer-shaped spacecraft without ever having seen one. A lot of other people have actually made up such stories, and about the aliens that abducted them, either for grisly experiments or to impart ineffable wisdom. Although. The aliens do tend to look alike, wherever they are spotted. Gracile body with two legs and two arms. Huge cranium, large liquid eyes, but small mouths and scrawny necks. That can’t be coincidence, surely?

    Of course, dragons are mentioned in the Bible, so they must have a historical basis, because God wouldn’t lie. And unicorns are mentioned in the Bible, too. What is your genealogy for them?

  4. well they are not just mentioned in the bible part of Rev. 19 and 20 is a story of a red dragon.
    so all the bible is ture or it’s not you can not have it both ways.

  5. One cannot take the whole book of Revelation literally without taking the message out of context which is true, on the other hand one doesn’t interpret the rest of the Bible as though it were Revelation either. Now Revelation 20 has seven symbols, namely: a key, a bottomless pit, a great chain, a dragon, a serpent, a thousand years, and a seal which is reference to the events in the last days. This has nothing to do with having it both ways!

  6. The creation stories aside. I think many dragon myths and legends are based on real animals. An example could be, an ancient trader in a new land comes across a 15 – 20 foot King Cobra. It rears up spreads it hood, hisses a bit, spits and whatever else they do. The trader has never seen a corba before and it scares the pants off him. The story he tells about the encounter grows with each new telling. Stories really get blown up when retold by someone who wasn’t even there. The beginning of a legend? Could be.

  7. @Michael: “One cannot take the whole book of Revelation literally without taking the message out of context which is true, on the other hand one doesn’t interpret the rest of the Bible as though it were Revelation either.”

    Let’s rephrase that just a skosh: “One cannot take the whole book of Genesis literally without taking the message out of context which is true, on the other hand one doesn’t interpret the rest of the Bible as though it were Genesis either.

    If your statement should be taken a priori, then why not mine?

    Taking Genesis as literally true does in fact miss its message. See, for example, The Meaning of Creation” (Knox press, 1984). Tha author, Conrad Hyers, was head of the Religion Department at Gustavus Adolphus College, where I was on the Board of Trustees for a few years. You can find a summary online at http://www.directionsjournal.org/article/?1031.

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